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    Solar
0 Suppliers

Customized and design integrated solar solutions.
Architecture | Electronics | Mobility | Fashion.

  • BIPV
  • Germany
  • Germany

The idea of ​​using solar energy and creating an environmentally friendly, renewable and free source of energy led to the founding of SUNSET Energietechnik GmbH in 1979, based in Adelsdorf near Erlangen. Since then, SUNSET has been consistently and successfully implementing this goal and is doing pioneering work to develop solar energy as a real alternative to conventional energy supply. In this way, SUNSET has grown into an [...]

  • BIPV
  • Germany
  • Germany

Hanover Solar is leading the solar cell technology. Our headquarter is located in Hanover, Germany and is responsible for managing all global branch companies, as well as the sales and warehousing of the German local market. Our manufacture has a combined annual capacity of 300mw for solar modules and cells. We have the best lab in our headquarters, with a professional team of engineers from Germany. We are using advanced technology, automatic [...]

  • BIPV
  • Germany
  • Germany

We offer solar modules both in glass-glass composite technology as well as in glass-foil technology to meet your individual design requests. Shape, color and transparency are perfectly adapted to your intended use. We use different types of glass and thicknesses and provide BIPV solar modules for facades, glazed roofs, shading elements for windows or roofs over patios and balconies, and much more. We develop both cold facade elements as well as [...]

  • BIPV
  • Germany
  • Germany

Antec Solar manufactures customer-specific PV modules in a variety of technical and optical design options for use in special applications and especially in building-integrated PV systems (BIPV). The technology is based on the extensive experience of ANTEC Solar GmbH in the production of CdTe and a-Si / µc-Si tandem thin-film solar modules.

  • Solar Panel, BIPV
  • Germany
  • Germany

Germany

What is Solar Energy in Germany?

Germany, despite being a sun-drenched country has been considered as one of the highest solar power outputs around the world and still possesses the most advanced and latest research about solar energy and has many new industry actors. Moreover, they’re expecting for the second wave of solar power expansion, which will soon bring success and progress for the solar technology’s full systemic integration.

For several years, Germany has been considered as the world’s top PV installer among other countries. At the end of the year 2016, Germany managed to build a total installed solar power capacity of 41.3 gigawatts (GW) which was behind China’s solar capacity.

Most solar power in Germany exclusively consists of photovoltaics (PV) systems only. Germany has only a little interest in concentrated solar power (CSP) for it does not use photovoltaics and this solar technology requires much higher solar insolation as compared to the PV system. However, there is still an experimental CSP-plant with 1.5 MW capacity which is being used solely for on-site engineering purposes only rather than for commercial electricity/power generation. This concentrated solar power is called the “Jülich Solar Tower” that is owned by the German Aerospace Center.

Moreover, in 2014, Germany managed to install about 1.5 million photovoltaic systems across the country which are ranging from small rooftop solar power systems to medium commercial and large utility-scale solar plants and farms. The largest solar farms of Germany are located in Neuhardenberg, Templin and Meuro with solar capacities of over 100 MW. Moreover, these PV technologies were accounted for an estimated 6.2 to 6.9 percent of Germany’s net electricity generation in the year 2016.

However, new installations of photovoltaic systems have slowed down steadily since the beginning of the year 2011. Also, it was estimated in the year 2017 that over 70 percent of the employment in the solar industry of the country have been lost in recent years. Solar power in Germany has gone through rough times since it has been started in the wake of Germany’s Renewable Energy Act in the year 2000. However, German companies quickly loomed to global leadership in solar power technology before a collapse in the solar industry happen and some of the companies were forced to hold their businesses.

Proponents from the Photovoltaic industry blamed the government for its lack of commitment in the said industry, while others point out that the loss of jobs in the solar sector is due to financial burden that was associated with the fast-paced launching and manufacturing of photovoltaics, which in their perspective was very unsustainable to the transition of renewable energies.

With all of these, still, the official governmental goal of Germany is to continuously improve and increase the contribution of renewable energy to the country’s overall electricity generation and consumption. By 2020, Germany is aiming for a long-term minimum target of 35 percent capacity, 50 percent by 2030 and around 80 percent power capacity by the end of 2050.

Currently, the country is significantly producing more electricity at specific times with high solar irradiation than the country’s needs, slowing down spot-market prices and exporting the country’s electricity surplus to nearby countries. In 2014, the record of exported electricity surplus reached almost 34 TWh. The decline of spot-prices in the market may raise the electricity prices for retail customers, as the expansion of the guaranteed feed-in tariff and spot-price increases as well.

As the combined share of fluctuating wind and solar energy is nearly achieving 17 percent of the national electricity mix, energy issues and problems are also being prevented and others becoming more manageable. This is because of the electrical grid adaptation, new grid-storage capacity construction, reduction of fossil fuels, altering of nuclear power plants and constructing a new generation of combined heat and power plants. Today, nuclear power and brown coal are the cheapest suppliers of electricity in Germany.

BIPV used for below projects in Germany

No Projects Found

BIPV

What is a Building Integrated Photovoltaic or a BIPV?

Building Integrated Photovoltaics serves more than one purpose. BIPVs produce electricity by the piezoelectric effect and serve as protection for any structure. 

BIPVs are installed to provide shed, block sunlight, and give a modern look to any building, all this while producing electricity from sunlight.

Where is a BIPV used?

A BIPV is integrated into a structure like conventional buildings. BIPVs replace glass windows with Solar windows, parking shed rooftops with solar roofs and solar shades in place of translucent covers. All these changes make the look of any structure modern while being extremely useful.

Types of Building Integrated Photovoltaics

Solar panels are silicon-based photovoltaic cells that produce electricity from sunlight. With micro adjustments according to the application, these cells transform into BIPVs. Based on various applications, there are broadly four types of BIPVs.

 

Four types of BIPV products

Image credit: Research Gate

  • Solar-Facades: Solar Facades’ integration in building structures keeps the noise and air pollution out and gives any building a visual identity. This all while producing green energy.
  • Solar-Window: Solar windows find their application both in residential and commercial properties. These windows look like any other windows but with solar modules.
  • Solar-Roofs: Solar roofs like that of Tesla Energy in the USA are becoming popular. In conventional rooftops, these solar tiles replace asphalt tiles. Every tile acts as an individual cell and connects in series to generate electricity.
  • PV-Sunshades: Parking lot sheds are the best example of PV-Sunshades. Additionally, these shades protect buildings from direct sunlight.

How does a BIPV work?

BIPVs use opaque or transparent solar cells connected in series to each other to give a substantial amount of current output. These photovoltaics are located in the portion of the building exposed to the sun the most.

What are big manufacturing brands of BIPVs?

Tesla Energy is one major brand in the USA backed by Elon Musk. They manufacture solar cell tiles for residential rooftops. Customers get a variety of tiles according to the required strength and size.

Some other contributors in this niche are:

  • D2solar
  • Mysolar USA  
  • Omnis Power USA Inc  
  • Redwood Renewables
  • Skyco Skylights
  • Solaria
  • Sonali Solar USA

OEM

Custom Made Solar Products OEM

OEM stands for Original Equipment Manufacturer which is commonly referred to as a company that manufactures and offers parts and accessories of items that are used as components of a product from another company. To sum it up, OEM commonly manufactures specific items on behalf of brands. Though OEM typically operates in the computer and technology industries, it also works in the solar industry.

Factories for White Label Solar Products

In the case of the solar industry, most solar companies work with solar OEMs to build and design their own solar products such as solar panels, cells, modules, etc. OEM becomes their outsourcing partner that helps them in assembling and reproducing their solar products.

Nowadays, a huge number of solar companies, particularly those large solar manufacturing companies, are partnering with outstanding solar OEMs to deliver the best quality solar products to their solar customers. Mainly, the reason is, these solar OEMs help solar manufacturers cut down their production costs since they no longer have to operate their own factories, purchase needed materials and hire labour to produce their solar products.

As a solar manufacturing company, the first thing you need to consider is to find the most reliable solar OEM in the market. One of the biggest perks of the internet these days is you can now easily find these OEMs even in the comfort of your home. With the help of a solar outsourcing marketplace such as SolarFeeds.com, you can easily find the most reliable and right OEM partner for your solar company. Solar outsourcing marketplace helps solar industry professionals gather accurate and timely information about solar including the list of most trusted Solar Original Equipment Manufacturers.

Germany

What is Solar Energy in Germany?

Germany, despite being a sun-drenched country has been considered as one of the highest solar power outputs around the world and still possesses the most advanced and latest research about solar energy and has many new industry actors. Moreover, they’re expecting for the second wave of solar power expansion, which will soon bring success and progress for the solar technology’s full systemic integration.

For several years, Germany has been considered as the world’s top PV installer among other countries. At the end of the year 2016, Germany managed to build a total installed solar power capacity of 41.3 gigawatts (GW) which was behind China’s solar capacity.

Most solar power in Germany exclusively consists of photovoltaics (PV) systems only. Germany has only a little interest in concentrated solar power (CSP) for it does not use photovoltaics and this solar technology requires much higher solar insolation as compared to the PV system. However, there is still an experimental CSP-plant with 1.5 MW capacity which is being used solely for on-site engineering purposes only rather than for commercial electricity/power generation. This concentrated solar power is called the “Jülich Solar Tower” that is owned by the German Aerospace Center.

Moreover, in 2014, Germany managed to install about 1.5 million photovoltaic systems across the country which are ranging from small rooftop solar power systems to medium commercial and large utility-scale solar plants and farms. The largest solar farms of Germany are located in Neuhardenberg, Templin and Meuro with solar capacities of over 100 MW. Moreover, these PV technologies were accounted for an estimated 6.2 to 6.9 percent of Germany’s net electricity generation in the year 2016.

However, new installations of photovoltaic systems have slowed down steadily since the beginning of the year 2011. Also, it was estimated in the year 2017 that over 70 percent of the employment in the solar industry of the country have been lost in recent years. Solar power in Germany has gone through rough times since it has been started in the wake of Germany’s Renewable Energy Act in the year 2000. However, German companies quickly loomed to global leadership in solar power technology before a collapse in the solar industry happen and some of the companies were forced to hold their businesses.

Proponents from the Photovoltaic industry blamed the government for its lack of commitment in the said industry, while others point out that the loss of jobs in the solar sector is due to financial burden that was associated with the fast-paced launching and manufacturing of photovoltaics, which in their perspective was very unsustainable to the transition of renewable energies.

With all of these, still, the official governmental goal of Germany is to continuously improve and increase the contribution of renewable energy to the country’s overall electricity generation and consumption. By 2020, Germany is aiming for a long-term minimum target of 35 percent capacity, 50 percent by 2030 and around 80 percent power capacity by the end of 2050.

Currently, the country is significantly producing more electricity at specific times with high solar irradiation than the country’s needs, slowing down spot-market prices and exporting the country’s electricity surplus to nearby countries. In 2014, the record of exported electricity surplus reached almost 34 TWh. The decline of spot-prices in the market may raise the electricity prices for retail customers, as the expansion of the guaranteed feed-in tariff and spot-price increases as well.

As the combined share of fluctuating wind and solar energy is nearly achieving 17 percent of the national electricity mix, energy issues and problems are also being prevented and others becoming more manageable. This is because of the electrical grid adaptation, new grid-storage capacity construction, reduction of fossil fuels, altering of nuclear power plants and constructing a new generation of combined heat and power plants. Today, nuclear power and brown coal are the cheapest suppliers of electricity in Germany.