JP Morgan NYC HQ Grabs LEED-Platinum Certification

JPMorgan Chase has earned LEED-Platinum certification for the  renovation of its global headquarters at 270 Park Avenue in       Manhattan – it’s the world’s largest renovation project to achieve Platinum status, the highest under the green building rating system.

Every system in the 50-story, 50-year-old building has been upgraded – from heating, air conditioning and lighting, to insulation, plumbing fixtures, flooring and outside views – all while the building remained occupied.

The building now consumes just half the electricity and water as it did before the renovation.

Green design and construction features include:

Energy Efficiency: upgraded HVAC; lighting with occupancy sensors and daylight dimming controls; Energy Star kitchen appliances, computers and monitors; new building insulation and window tint to reduce glare, heat gain and air conditioning load.

Water Conservation: A 54,000 gallon tank in the basement collects rain water from roof drains, which is stored and filtered, and then used for landscaping and flushing toilets in the lower part of the building – saving over a million gallons a year. Combined with other plumbing upgrades the building will use half as much water as pre-renovation.

Landscaping:  Nearly 16,500 square feet of new landscaping, including green roofs with low-maintenance plants, will lower building temperatures in the summer and reduce stress on the city’s sewer system on rainy days. An herb garden provides fresh herbs and vegetables the building’s restaurant.

Recycling:  Over 99% of the original building was re-used and 85% of construction waste was recycled, including 990,000 square feet of carpeting. Over 12,000 tons of construction waste was diverted from landfills.

Transportation: the building has 266 bike racks

Employee Health/ Productivity: 85% of employees now have natural daylight at their desks, and 92% have exterior         views.

Over 44,000 projects have earned LEED green building certification, comprising over 8 billion square feet, in all 50 states and 120 countries. Nearly 15,000 homes have been certified under the LEED for       Homes rating system, with more than 65,000 more homes registered.

Original Article on SustainableBusiness.com

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One Comment;

  1. home performance energy auditor said:

    According to a study by the California Sustainable Building Task Force, a collection of building industry representatives and state agency officials, with help from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, constructing a certified green building costs on average about 2 percent more than a traditional building of the same size. But the extra cost, according to the study, yields a tenfold savings over 20 years through lower energy and water bills, reduced waste disposal costs and increased productivity and health of workers.
    Bob

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